Upcoming Event: ERSA Welcome Potluck

Join us Friday, September 7th at 5:30 at Guichon Creek at BCIT to  welcome new students in the program and to catch up with past and present students. There will be games, food, and an all-around good time to be had. We hope to see you there!

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We will also be bringing some lawn games, so if you have bocce, croquet, frisbees, a slackline, or other fun games please bring them! We will post a games sign up sheet, so that we know who brought what and can make sure everyone gets their games back at the end of the night 🙂

New Comment (and Compliment) Box

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A beautiful handcrafted comment box has recently been added to the ERSA common room at SFU (TASC II room 7540) and all are encouraged to submit anonymous comments, suggestions and compliments.

These can be suggestions for ERSA (how things are run, major concerns, etc.) that you wish to keep anonymous. We hope this will provide another avenue for communication, transparency and accountability with our student council. As always, you are welcome to come talk to us directly.

The box has already been put to use and received its first bit of feedback, a compliment! The Comment Box will be opened and comments addressed each ERSA meeting. So if you have any comments, compliments or ideas you would like to share, give the Comment Box a try! Also feel free to contact ERSA through email found HERE

Project Spotlight: Ashleigh Westphal – Hydroelectric development and secretive marsh birds

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My project involves working with CWS and its partners to determine how hydroelectric development in the West Kootenays may be impacting marsh bird populations. The Canadian Wildlife Service has been surveying marsh bird species in BC’s Southern Interior Mountains since 2010. These surveys focus on marsh bird species that tend to be more secretive in nature, therefore harder to observe and study. In the West Kootenay region, significant sections of the Columbia and Kootenay Rivers and their tributaries have been impounded or otherwise altered by hydroelectric projects. These projects alter the landscape and ecosystem processes in a variety of ways, altering vegetation communities, flood regimes, and nutrient cycling just to name a few. Additionally, large sections of the Creston Valley floodplain have been altered by agricultural development and diking. In 2016, surveys began in the Columbia Wetlands region of the East Kootenays. These wetlands are relatively unaltered and one of the longest intact wetland complexes in North America.

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