ID’ing, and surveying, and radio telemetry! Oh my!

As we’ve learned throughout the year, timely monitoring paired with good science is key to developing a baseline of site conditions, and gauging success following restoration. We spent the first few weeks of May learning how to design and implement survey methods in terrestrial and aquatic environments. The first week, focused on terrestrial surveys, included small mammal trapping, radio telemetry, amphibian surveys, as well as bird and vegetation surveys. The highlight of the week was certainly trapping grey voles and deer mice in the old growth and secondary growth at Mission Tree Farm. Fish sampling and ID’ing, in situ water quality analysis, and the Fish Habitat Assessment Procedures (FHAP) were explored during the second week (aquatic). In addition to survey methods, we had our hand at log drilling and cabling. This is a restoration technique in which large woody debris is installed into a river to increase stream complexity for fish. Overall, I’d say those two weeks were an engaging, fun-filled, and great way to end year one of the program!

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Top left to bottom right: Newt caught with a Gee trap; Rock drilling; Grey vole; ID’ing juvenile salmonids; Log drilling; Pole seining; Fish caught in gill net; Tagging a deer mouse; Surveying for nests.

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